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Category: Strategic Thinking (page 1 of 14)

What Are You Trying to Produce?

produce assembly lineOne of the questions I ask all the time is, “What do we want people to do?” Another is, “What do we want people to become?” The correct answers to these questions are not generalizations (i.e., fully devoted followers, disciples, etc.). The correct answers are very specific and defined.

Think about these two questions. Can you see that they are both about next steps? Can you see also they are both about outcomes and products?

When we think in advance about what we want people to do we are more likely to design the program, event, or message with that next step in mind. When we think in advance about what we want people to become we are more likely to design the program, event, or message with that outcome in mind.

Thinking in advance about outcomes and products is at the very heart of designing effective next steps and first steps. When we take the time to thoughtfully determine these two things in advance (i.e., “What do we want people to do?” and, “What do we want people to become?”), we dramatically increase our chances of succeeding, of actually arriving at the preferred future we dream of for our ministry and for the people we are leading.

Can you see that asking these questions in advance actually helps clarify what a win will be for the program, event or message we are planning? That’s right. Determining and declaring on the front end the outcomes and products you desire will not only help you plan the program, event or message, it will enable you to know whether you are winning.

I love this quote from Mike Bonem’s Leading from the Second Chair:

“I am convinced that the reason for so much burnout, lack of commitment, and low performance in our churches among staff and members is directly related to the failure to declare the results we are after.  We don’t know when we are winning.”

Would you like to decrease burnout, lack of commitment, and low performance? Spend more time determining in advance what you want people to do and what you want people to become. Be specific. Define the next step you want people to take and what you want them to become. And then design the event, program or message with that outcome, with that product in mind.

Further Reading:

Test-Drives, Taste Tests, and Toes-in-the-Water

toes in the waterTest-Drives, Taste Tests, and Toes-in-the-Water

Buying without trying is down.

Contracts and long commitments are out.

File these under #ThingsYouMustKeepInMind

Test-Drives, Taste Tests, and Toes-in-the-Water are in.

Question: How does this affect you and me?

I think it ought to affect us in two ways:

First, it ought to reshape our thinking about the importance of offering test-drives, taste-tests and toes-in-the-water. Think about it. Virtually everything is now available to be experienced now and purchased later.

You can listen to the song before you buy on iTunes. You can read a portion of the book on Amazon. You can arrange a test-drive of just about any car you’d like to drive. You can ask for a taste at the ice cream store or the brewery. Many clothing and shoe manufacturers now offer free shipping and free returns to entice you to try on their product.

If we want to connect unconnected people we should be offering test-drives, taste-tests and toes-in-the-water. Most of what we are offering feels like something you buy before you try (which is a very antiquated sales strategy). How long ago did that pass into history in just about every other arena?

Second, it ought to reshape our thinking about the length of commitment we’re asking for. Think about it. Renting is on the rise. Services like Spotify, Apple Music, Netflix and Hulu make it increasingly common to pay for access rather than purchase.

When we plan small group connecting events we should keep in mind that long commitments are out. If we want to help unconnected people take a step to join a group we should be offering baby steps.

Note: Baby steps must be designed with babies in mind. What is a baby step to a baby is a very important thing to understand. What we think is a baby step is often seen as a giant step by the babies themselves. And their perspective is the only perspective that matters.

Further Reading:

Image by Christine Rondeau

How Foggy Is What’s Next for Your Small Group Ministry?

foggyHow Foggy Is What’s Next for Your Small Group Ministry?

Do you know where you’re going? Can you see it clearly? Or is the road ahead kind of foggy?

I’m often asked, “How do you determine what’s next for your small group ministry?”

Here’s how I think about what’s next:

First, I begin with a honest evaluation of how it is going right now.

I am convinced that Andy Stanley is right when he says, “Your ministry is perfectly designed to produce the results you are currently experiencing.” These are the facts and they are undisputed.

Why start there? Easy. Before I plan what’s next I need to think about how it is actually going right now (i.e., is our current strategy or plan working?). It’s important to look at what you are doing through the lens of “is what we are doing actually working?”

If you care about where you are going you must begin with an honest appraisal of how well or poorly your strategy is working.

Second, I look again and again at the preferred future we have identified.

We talk about our preferred future many ways, but it always includes the following:

  • We want to have more adults in groups than we have attend a worship service on the weekend.
  • We must focus on making disciples as we connect unconnected people.
  • We want to make as easy as possible for people to step into leadership and nearly automatic that they step onto a leader development conveyor belt.

There are certainly other aspects to our preferred future, but these are preeminent. When these are truly preeminent, we are forced to view our current results through the lens of “is what we are doing actually working?”

Third, I determine which aspects of our preferred future could be attained next.

This is important and it is often overlooked. While connecting more adults in groups is certainly an aspect of our preferred future, it is not the only one.

  • We should be determining what we can do in the short term to make more and better disciples.
  • We should be determining what we can do in the short term to make it easier to step into leadership and more automatic that new leaders step onto a leader development conveyor belt.

I refer to this as keeping one eye on the preferred future and the other eye on the next milestone. Maintaining focus on the end in mind, using preferred future language to cast vision for the promised land is a non-negotiable. Milestones that are clearly visible in the near future enable your team to stay focused and encouraged.

How are you determining what’s next for your small group ministry?

Can you see it? Are you seeing your preferred future clearly enough? Are you honestly evaluating how it’s going right now? Are you determining aspects that are attainable in the short term?

Further Reading:

Image by Emma Story

Who Designs Your Next Steps? Starry-Eyed Dreamers or Steely-Eyed Pragmatists?

next stepsWho Designs Your Next Steps? Starry-Eyed Dreamers or Steely-Eyed Pragmatists?

Who designs your next steps? Starry-eyed dreamers or steely-eyed pragmatists?

It makes a difference, you know.

Starry-eyed dreamers often put steps in place that Carl Lewis* wouldn’t attempt. Steely-eyed pragmatists can sometimes design steps that are dismissed by dreamers as lacking challenge.

While next steps should be easy, obvious, and strategic…reasonable and doable are clearly in the eye of the beholder. [Click to Tweet]

If you want to design and offer next steps for everyone and first steps for their friends…you must keep the needs, interests, and maturity of the step taker in mind. The real test is not what seems reasonable or doable to the designer.

Not sure whether your next steps are designed correctly? Results are the true test. “Your ministry is perfectly designed to produce the results you are currently experiencing (Andy Stanley).” Not getting the results you hoped for? The design of your next steps determines everything.

Further Reading:

*Lewis’ world record long jump at 8.79 meters (28.83 feet) has stood since the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.

 

The Future of Small Group Ministry (and how to prepare for it)

future weather vaneThe Future of Small Group Ministry (and how to prepare for it)

I don’t know about you, but I’ve long been intrigued by a somewhat obscure Old Testament reference to the men of Issachar. Tucked away into a long list of those who joined David when he was banished by King Saul, we’re told about the men of Issachar “who understood the times and knew what Israel should do (1 Chronicles 12:32 NIV).”

Do you understand the times? Do you know what we should be doing? Can you see where things are going? Have you taken the time yet to stop and think about what where things are going means for small group ministry?

When you read the reports coming out of the Barna organization, when you read what Gabe Lyons, David Kinnaman and James Emery White are writing, for that matter when you simply listen to the news and read the headlines, it’s not hard to feel a change in the wind. The truth is, “The future is already here. It’s just not very evenly distributed (William Gibson).”

As I think about what is coming, here’s what I think is the future of small group ministry…and how to prepare for it.

The future of small group ministry (and how to prepare for it):

“Meet me at Starbucks” will be a much more common invite than “meet me at my church.”

As even the most attractional churches become less appealing to post-Christian America, it will become much easier to invite someone to “meet me at Starbucks (or the pub.” As a first step for unchurched (or dechurched) friends, neighbors, co-workers and family members, “Come to my church” will just seem so 20th century. On the flip side, the next Christians will see their home for what it really is: the 21st century equivalent of an excellent host in the 1st century.

“Tonight we’re studying John chapter 15” will require a lot of explanation.

You do realize that the further we go into the 21st century, the less biblically literate the culture becomes. Every study demonstrates this conclusively. This means you need to anticipate that even references that were assumed all your life (who Joseph was or that the Gospel of John was written by one of Jesus’ closest friends and followers) are now obscure and remote, Culturally savvy group leaders will approach teaching opportunities like Paul did in Acts 17 and assume unfamiliarity while deftly connecting spiritual truth with what is familiar.

Connecting strategies will be tilted toward strong ties.

Face it. The most connected people in your congregation are the least connected people in their neighborhoods and offices. The least connected people in your congregation and crowd are almost always the most connected people in the community. When the least connected people in your congregation and crowd participate in a social event (office party, block party, Little League game, softball league, etc.), they are strengthening ties with people who have never attended your church. Why not leverage these already established strong ties?

If all of your connecting strategies depend on unconnected attenders signing up to attend an event that happens on-campus you are already missing out on the most natural way to connect people. Wise leaders will gravitate toward and develop new strategies that leverage pre-existing strong ties.

Vision and training will focus on cultivating friendships in the community.

As the shift to a Post-Christian America accelerates, it becomes ever more important to envision and equip members to invest in their neighbors, co-workers, acquaintances and family, cultivating genuine friendships in the community. What about your fall festival and your Easter egg hunt? Wise observers of culture will innovate and experiment with neighborhood and even cul de sac expressions that make introductions and developing friendships more likely.

The value added element will be relationship and the byproduct will be discipleship.

Belonging absolutely precedes believing or becoming. If this isn’t obvious, refer to Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. There was certainly a time in the mid 20th century when it was still common to grow old in the neighborhood you were born in, to know your neighbors and even socialize with your co-workers. As mobility increases and neighborhoods and cities become more and more transient, loneliness and a vague sense of disconnection grows. Wise leadership will make it ordinary to prioritize and normalize loving your neighbor as yourself. See also, 5 Things I Wish You Knew as You Build Your Small Group Ministry.

Leader development and encouragement will be almost entirely decentralized.

Churches everywhere are beginning to discover that the pace of life is making centralized gatherings more difficult to demand and less productive to implement.  Far easier to instill and more productive are decentralized gatherings at the local coffee shop or for that matter, in the living room or kitchen.  See also, 7 Decisions that Predetermine Small Group Ministry Impact.

Storytelling will emerge as a best practice in thriving small group ministries.

We live in the era of storytelling. Yes, people have always been captivated by stories, but today more than ever before to tell a compelling story is to catch and hold the attention of a culture that suffers from an attention deficit disorder. We do have the greatest story. If we want to convince the unconnected crowd and community of the priceless value of authentic community, we must become better storytellers.

Organic connecting practices will be the rule rather than the exception.

You may have become a master at planning and executing connecting strategies (small group connections, GroupLink, small group fairs, etc.), but the further we step into 21st century post-Christian America, the more important organic connecting practices will become. As even the most attractional churches become less attractive destinations, it will become more and more important that we naturally, organically, build relationships with neighbors, friends, co-workers and family members. Effective small group ministries in the future will feel much more like interconnected hubs of relationship woven into the fabric of the neighborhoods, workplaces, and third places of our cities.

Disciplemaking will be the priority and practice of ordinary Jesus followers.

As the 21st century post-Christian America feels more like the pre-Christian 1st century, the lives of authentic Jesus followers will become more and more attractive to a culture several generations removed from experiencing the life-on-life impact of people who truly love their neighbors as themselves. That kind of love is the basis for true disciplemaking as come and see leads to taste and see.

Click here for 4 Keys to Preparing for the Future of Small Group Ministry.

What do you think?  Have a question?  Want to argue?  You can click here to jump into the conversation.

Further Reading:

Image by Frank Alcazar

This Concept Might Change Your Strategy

circle and squareSpoiler Alert: The most connected people in your congregation almost always have the fewest connections in the community.

Four Things You Need to Know

I use this drawing to illustrate an important concept.  There are four things you need to know in order to understand the drawing,

First, the circle represents your adult attendance on Easter.  As you know, the difference between your average adult attendance and your Easter adult attendance is not that everyone brings a friend.  Instead, the main reason your attendance is higher on Easter is that everyone comes on the same weekend. See also, What Percentage of Your Adults Are Actually Connected?

Second, the square represents the people in your congregation who are truly connected.  That is, if something happened to them or a member of their family, someone else in your congregation would find out about it within 24 hours without anyone calling the church.  A pink slip at work.  Marital issues.  A scary medical diagnosis.  A teenager who goes south.  24 hours.  Someone else knows.

Third, if you were to interview the folks in the square (the most connected people in your congregation) and ask who their 10 closest friends are in your area, you’d find out that 8, 9, or even all 10 of them are also inside the square.  Now, before you get excited, there are exceptions (many church staff members, those with the gift of evangelism, etc.).  But in general, the most connected people in your congregation are the least connected in the community.

Fourth, when you interview the folks in the circle you’ll find out that 8, 9, or even all 10 of their best friends have never been to your church.  Let me repeat that:

When you interview the folks in the circle you’ll find out that 8, 9, or even all 10 of their best friends have never been to your church.

Here’s the big idea: If you want to recruit hosts who can fill their own group with unconnected neighbors, friends, co-workers and family members…you need to learn how to recruit from the circle.  Churches that keep going back to the well of the usual suspects (the most connected) shouldn’t be surprised when hosts from the square don’t know their neighbors.

What do you think?  Have a question?  Want to argue?  You can click here to jump into the conversation.

Further Reading:

What Do Your Goals Say about Your Ministry?

goals finish lineYou can learn a lot about ministries and organizations by analyzing their goals.

Some churches have attendance goals.

Some churches have baptism goals.

Some multi-site church have goals for the number of sites.

Some churches have church planting goals.

Your church’s goals are an indication of priorities (of your true priorities). Goals can be something like a litmus test or a lie detector, betraying what is genuinely important. Goals are commonly an indication of passion or heart.

What do your church’s goals say about your ministry?

Reflecting on North Point Ministries 20 year anniversary, Andy Stanley said,

“20 years in people ask me, ‘What would you change if you started over?’ Our one numeric goal (to have 100,000 people in groups*) has shaped everything. It has shaped everything including our budget. Your goals shape where the money goes. Groups is the best bet.”

20 years.

One numeric goal.

100,000 people in groups.

What do your church’s goals say about your ministry?

What do you think?  Have a question? You can click here to jump into the conversation.

*North Point Ministries has 72,000 adults, teens and children in groups as of May, 2016.

Image by Wally Gobetz

A Values-Driven Culture Is Essential

culture“Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” Often attributed to Peter Drucker, this is a line right at the heart of an important challenge for all of us. We work hard on choosing our small group model, system or strategy and that is a very good thing.

Strategy is important. But at the end of the day, at the end of the ministry season or year, if your culture is toxic or unhealthy…you’re going to have a very hard time getting to your preferred future.

I’ve been studying culture for many years.  I’ve come back to it many times, recognizing again and again that creating culture and influencing culture is my number one priority.

Here are some resources that you need to know about as you do the same in your own environment.

Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast

I love the new Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast. If you aren’t yet subscribed, you need to stop what you are doing right now and sign up to get this podcast. You can do that right here.

In March and April, Craig shared some tremendously valuable thoughts on creating a values-driven culture. Oh my! So good.

“Healthy cultures never happen by accident.”

“Your culture is a combination of what you create and what you allow.”

“The number one force that shapes your culture is your values.”

“What we value determines what we do. Your values shape what you do.”

“If you want a different culture, change what you value.”

“Strong values attract the right people and weed out the wrong people.”

Creating a Values-Driven Culture, Part OneShow Notes

Creating a Values-Driven Culture, Part TwoShow Notes

Andy Stanley Leadership Podcast

Another podcast you ought to be subscribed to is the Andy Stanley Leadership Podcast. Seriously, if you aren’t listening to this podcast you are so missing out! You can subscribe to it right here.

Back in May, June and July of 2013 Andy talked about culture and behaviors (

Better Before Bigger

Defining Your Organizational Culture, Part One

Defining Your Organizational Culture, Part Two

Granger Community Church

Granger Community Church reworked their values several years ago. Very thought-provoking stuff. Take a look at their values as you are learning about culture and values.

Core Values: Shaping the Way We Think and Act (This is a very good article on the importance of core values from Tony Morgan)

Granger’s Mission and Values

Assignment:

I hope you’ll take the challenge and spend some time with this! I’m convinced, and I hope you are or soon will be, that creating a values-driven culture is at the root of how we build thriving ministries.

Image by lpk 90901

How Many of These 4 Essential Activities Are You Missing?

essential activitiesHow Many of These Essential Activities Are You Missing?

What if it turned out that you spent your time and energy focusing on good things but not the right things?

What if at the end of the season you realized that while you were busy taking care of the squeakiest wheels, you were overlooking the bigger issues or opportunities?

What if at the end of your ministry you finally saw with stark clarity what you sensed was happening but never acted on?

Peter Drucker pointed out that “every institution must build into its day-to-day management four essential entrepreneurial activities that run in parallel.” He went on to point out activities, these disciplines, were not just desirable but “conditions for survival today.”

Here are the four activities that Drucker isolated as essential:

  1. Organized abandonment of products, services, and processes that are no longer the optimal allocation of resources.
  2. Organized for systematic, continuing, improvement.
  3. Organized for systematic and continuous exploitation of successes.
  4. Organized for systematic innovation.

Spend a moment and evaluate how effectively you are addressing each of the four activities:

Organized abandonment of products, services, and processes that are no longer the optimal allocation of resources.

Are any of your products, services or processes holdovers from a previous era? Are any of your products, services or processes still budgeted for even though less effective than they once were? Still allocated prime space or optimal times? Still occupy the attention of key staff or high capacity volunteers?

According to Peter Drucker, the organized abandonment of products, services and processes that are no longer the optimal allocation of resources is a condition for survival.

Organized for systematic, continuing, improvement.

Which of your products, services or processes are you systematically improving?

According to Peter Drucker, organizing for systematic, continuing, improvement is a condition for survival.

Organized for systematic and continuous exploitation of successes.

Which of your latest successes have you exploited by increasing the budget, moving to prime location or time, or adding key staff or high capacity volunteers?

According to Peter Drucker, organizing for systematic and continuous exploitation of success is a condition for survival.

Organized for systematic innovation.

How frequently are you setting aside time, energy, and budget to explore new opportunities? Craig Groeschel pointed out that “if you want to reach people no one else is reaching, you have to do things that no one else is doing.”

According to Peter Drucker, organizing for systematic innovation is a condition for survival.

Which of the four essential activities are you missing?

As you evaluate your ministry, which of the four essential activities are you doing? Which of the four activities are you missing?

What if they really are conditions for survival?

What do you think? Have a question?  You can click here to jump into the conversation.

Image by Mob Mob

Further Reading:

Determining What to Do…and What Not to Do

determine what to doHow do you determine what to do…and what not to do?

How do you determine which next steps in include? And which to eliminate?

How do you determine which menu items to add? And which to remove?

cone_slide8I have used the term “the preferred future” to describe where we dream of arriving. The preferred future is what we dream our small group ministry looks like. It is what a small group leader or coach is becoming. It is what a disciple is becoming.

Not every path leads to the preferred future. There may be more than one way to get there, but there are many that lead elsewhere.

And in order to arrive anywhere you must choose the path carefully. Not every path leads to the preferred future. There may be more than one way to get there, but there are many that lead elsewhere.

In order to become anything you must choose your physical or mental regimen carefully. Not every activity or routine leads to the preferred future. There may be more than one way to get there, but there are many that lead elsewhere.

According to Michael Porter,the father of modern strategy, “the essence of strategy is choosing what not to do.”

If you’ve been in on very much of this conversation, you are probably becoming very familiar with this diagram.  I use it for all kinds of discussions (you’ll see many of them right here), but we’ve rarely talked about choosing what not to do.

Choosing what not to do is very near the heart of identifying your preferred future.  If you study the diagram for a moment, you’ll see that the preferred future is actually a subset of three areas:

  • The Probable Future: I think of this as a way of describing the way things will be in your ministry or organization if nothing changes.  You pick the timeline, 5 years, 10 years, 20 years, it doesn’t matter.  The probable future is what things will look like if you’re doing the same things.  See also, Start with the End in Mind.
  • The Possible Future: This is actually all of the known or imagined possibilities for the future.  For example, you might have a meeting where you brainstorm as many possibilities for connecting people as you can.  See also, Where Do You Want to Go with Your Small Group Ministry?
  • The Adjacent Possible: This section isn’t labeled in the diagram, but if you look closely in the preferred future section, you’ll notice that it includes some of what is actually beyond the possible future.  See that?  The white space.  I think of the adjacent possible as the Ephesians 3:20-21 aspect of the preferred future.  See also, Grouplife Agnostics and the Adjacent Possible.

Calling out the preferred future is really a three step process:

  1. identifying the gold of what you are currently doing
  2. imagining all of the possibilities beyond what you are currently doing
  3. choosing what not to do trims out the extra that may very well be good but not great.

What do you think?  Have a question?  Want to argue? You can click here to jump into the conversation.

Image by Seongbin Im

Further reading:

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