Empty Promises: A Compelling New Study from Pete Wilson

Had an opportunity this weekend to dive into Empty Promises, Pete Wilson’s newest DVD-driven study.  Wilson, the founding and senior pastor of Cross Point Church in Nashville, Tennessee is widely recognized as one of America’s most creative communicators.  This study makes it easy to see why.  Based on his recent book, Empty Promises: The Truth About You, Your Desires, and the Lies You’re Believing, this 6 session study is going to be very popular.

Similar in design to Putting Plan B into Action (released in 2011), each session is anchored by a visually creative teaching video featuring Pete Wilson.  8 to 10 minutes in length, the six video segments are consistently captivating as a back story emerges.  Way more than a talking head, the creative use of story compellingly illustrated in the background makes the truth of scripture come alive visually.

The Participant Guide pulls group members into an engaging discussion launched by the video.  Solidly biblical, the included questions will help members wrestle with deeply personal topics.  A free downloadable  leader’s guide is designed to maximize the impact of the study.  You can download a pdf copy right here.

In addition to the group discussion questions, every session in the Participant Guide also includes 5 days of personal devotions designed to help members continue to think, meditate and reflect about what they’re learning in their small group.  The mix of related scripture and questions for reflection will help take the experience further for members whether they’re long-time Christ followers,  brand new to their faith, or even just beginning to investigate.

I really like the format of Empty Promises.  Highly creative, the video packs a solid punch that will prompt some great discussion.  Group members that engage in the daily devotional reading will discover how to turn their focus and worship away from the endless pursuit of more  and toward the only thing that will set them “absolutely free.”  A very compelling study.  I liked Empty Promises and I think you will too.