Friday’s List | June 23

fridays-listEvery Friday I post a short list of the things I’m reading, listening to, loving and wrestling with:

Here’s what I’m reading right now:

The Top 7 Reasons Guests Return To Your Church by Dan Reiland. How does your church stack up with this list?.

Grow Or Shrink. You are doing one. Which? by Stephen Brewster. I like Stephen’s work. This article is a good example.

Staffing & Structure: 3 Weaknesses Most Churches Unknowingly Experience by Tammy Kelley on TonyMorganLive.com. Great insights here.

WHEN APTITUDE IS NOT ENOUGH by Michael Hyatt. I like Michael’s thinking. This article is very helpful for anyone who feels like they’re in the wrong job.

HOW TO GET MORE CASH COWS by Michael Hyatt. If you have any aspirations for developing a side hustle or developing an additional income stream…this is great..

5 Warning Signs That Laziness Is Creeping into Your Leadership by Eric Geiger on LifeWay Leadership (HT Tim Stevens). Very thought-provoking.

4 Chair Discipling: Growing a Movement of Disciple-Makers by Dann Spader. Just 20 pages in and this is another great book. Looking forward to blogging about it.

The Culture Engine: A Framework for Driving Results, Inspiring Your Employees, and Transforming Your Workplace by S. Chris Edmonds. Part of my learning path this year.

Here’s what I’m listening to:

Fire Your Inner Boss on the Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast. This monthly podcast is always very good. This topic is good for all of us.

The Answer To How Is Yes with Peter Block on the Accidental Creative Podcast. This is a rebroadcast from 2008 on the podcast. Block’s book, The Answer to How Is Yes is a game changer.

Regi Campbell On Radical Mentorship For Men That Transforms Their Leadership And Families on the Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast. This is a very interesting conversation. It takes a while to get around to mentoring, but well worth it.

The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future Audible Audiobook – Unabridged by Kevin Kelly. Very interesting. One of the books I’m recommending on my 2017 Summer Reading List.

Quotes I’m wrestling with:

“We think we are in the land of the living on the way to the land of dying. My friend, nothing could be further from the biblical truth. You and I are in the land of the dying on the way to the land of the living.” A quote from Charlie Dyer included in 4 Chair Discipling: Growing a Movement of Disciple-Makers by Dann Spader.

App I’m using:

I’m committed this year to increasing my effectiveness. Nozbe is a leading productivity app. First heard about it from Michael Hyatt. It’s already making a big difference.

My own post I hope you’re reading:

What Do You Believe about Groups that Actually Isn’t True?

When you think about small groups and small group ministry, the way they work and don’t work, what they are and aren’t, what they can do and can’t do…what do you believe about groups, that actually isn’t true?

What do you believe about groups…that actually isn’t true? You can read the article right here.

Must-Read: Add 4 Chair Discipling to Your Disciple-Making Resource List

I spent some time this week with 4 Chair Discipling: Growing a Movement of Disciple-Makers by Dann Spader. Published in 2014, this one began hitting my radar a couple years ago, but is just now making it onto my reading stack (one of the books on my 2017 Summer Reading List).

Dann Spader is the founder of Sonlife Ministries, a training organization that trains, coaches and mentors leaders, providing a fresh encounter with Jesus as our model for making and multiplying disciples. Spader is currently serving as a training consultant for Southeast Christian Church in Louisville KY, helping them develop their disciple-making strategy.

4 Chair Discipling looks at the life of Christ through the lens of a new person who wants to become a Christ-follower (p. 143).” I really like the way Spader looks carefully at the sequential steps Jesus took with his closest followers. So helpful, a chronological examination is eye-opening in terms of understanding Jesus’ model.

The essence of Jesus’ model or strategy is outlined in “four challenges He posed to His followers: ‘come and see’ (John 1:39), ‘follow me’ (John 1:43), ‘follow me and I will make you fishers of men’ (Matthew 4:39), and ‘go and bear much fruit’ (John 15:16) (p. 13).”

Spader provides a very readable examination of Jesus’ model. I’d probably call it a page-turner if it weren’t also packed with insights that demand reflection. My copy is marked and highlighted extensively (so I can circle back and think more about these implications and applications).

Well-organized, 4 Chair Discipling offers a very clear example (and numerous personal illustrations) of how Jesus’ model can be applied in the 21st century. Like me, I think you’ll come away with a number of unforgettable insights.

The book also includes two important chapters on the sticking points and barriers between “chairs.” Further, the appendices provide a helpful overview of how to build a disciple-making ministry.

If you’re looking for a fresh understanding of how to make disciples the way Jesus did, 4 Chair Discipling is a must-read. I highly recommend it.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above may be “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Top 10 Ways to Find New Members for Your Group

Skill Training: Top 10 Ways to Find New Members for Your Group

Who makes the best new members for your group? That’s easy. Unconnected people with whom you are actively building a relationship. Here are some ideas that will help you find new members:

  1. Look for people who are already doing the same things you are. If you have a  middle schooler, make it a point to get to know other parents. If your kids are younger…make it a point to meet other parents as you check your kids in on Sunday morning. Whether you’re in a bunko group, on a softball team, do scrapbooking, or regularly watch your kids’ little league games…be on the lookout for people who are already doing the same things that you are.
  2. If you sit in the same area or the auditorium every week, you’ll often begin to notice some of the same people. Get in the habit of getting to know one or two new people every week. In the “say hello to a few people around you” part of the service…make it a point to remember their names. Write their name(s) down as soon as you sit down. As the service ends tell them you’ll see them next week.
  3. Take a few minutes in your next meeting to talk about who your members know that would be a good fit in your group. It’s a good idea to talk through the Circles of Life handout (click here to download a copy). Sometimes all you need is something to jog your memory.
  4. Plan a social get-together (potluck, cookout, theme dinner, chili cookoff, etc.) and invite unconnected friends over. This is a great idea to schedule on a regular basis between studies. The perfect way to get to know a few new people.
  5. Volunteer to serve at your new member class (whether it’s 101 or NeXT, every church has a “new here” class or experience). Think about it. Everyone at the class is taking a next step…the perfect time to join a small group.
  6. One step sooner? If your church has a “New Here?” kiosk in the lobby (or just outside the auditorium), volunteer to serve there. There may be no better way to meet a lot of new people who have gone out of their way to connect.
  7. Volunteer to serve as an usher or greeter. You’ll see a lot of the same people.  Easy to be friendly and invite them to your group.
  8. Volunteer to serve at the small group kiosk in your lobby. You’ll have first crack at the people looking for a group! How cool is that!
  9. Volunteer to serve with…(see a pattern developing? Almost every volunteer opportunity will put you in contact with unconnected people.
  10. Make sure your group is absolutely, positively, up-to-date in the Small Group Finder.

Click here to download a copy of this article.

Further Reading:

Top 10 Simple Skill Trainings for New Small Group Hosts

Skill Training | Top 10 Ways to Learn to Pray Together

10 Essential Small Group Leader Skills

You’ll find my all my skill training articles right here.

Testing a Feature of GroupLife Insider on June 27th

Office HoursI’m continuing to work on a new service I’ll be launching soon. GroupLife Insider, a new member site, will allow me to focus more of my time helping a select group of small group ministry point people. Membership rates will be very affordable and available with a monthly or discounted annual subscription. Click here to read more about GroupLife Insider.

One of the features I am maybe disproportionately excited about is a weekly “office hours” concept. Like when you were in college and your professors had “office hours” and you could drop by and ask questions about assignments and projects. Everyone who was in the office benefitted. Both the questioners and the eavesdroppers.

I’ve thought about this concept for a long time. Full disclosure: It’s really something Carl George mentioned to me that he was thinking of doing. Ever since that day I’ve thought this could be a lot of fun and very helpful for the most interested students.

How will office hours work for GroupLife Insider members? It will be a regularly scheduled video conference session that members will have the password to attend.

Testing GroupLife Insider Office Hours Soon

I’m testing the concept on Tuesday, June 27th, from 9:00 to 10:00 a.m. (PDT, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. (EDT).

Want to check it out?

Only those who have expressed interest in GroupLife Insider will get an invite (Note: If you’re already on the GroupLife Insider list, you don’t need to sign up again).

I’d love to include you!

Sign up to find out more right here:

Can’t see the sign up form? Click here to sign up.

What Do You Believe about Groups that Actually Isn’t True?

axiomatic lock

What Do You Believe about Groups that Actually Isn’t True?

When you think about small groups and small group ministry, the way they work and don’t work, what they are and aren’t, what they can do and can’t do…what do you believe about groups, that actually isn’t true?

What do you believe about groups…that actually isn’t true?

Ever stop to think about that?

It could make quite a difference, you know. If you came to terms with what you believe is true about groups that actually isn’t it could be revolutionary.

If you carefully examined what you believe is true about groups and then acted to change anything based on a misbelief…it would almost certainly produce an immediate change in results.

Right?

Remember, “Your ministry is perfectly designed to produce the results you are currently experiencing (Andy Stanley).” If you don’t like the results, it may be that your design is based on a belief or two that isn’t actually true.

A personal example

In the early 90s I became aware of Meta Church Model of small groups (a largely American version of the cell model). Willow Creek embraced a version of the meta church model in the early 90s and successfully leveraged that model to connect 20,000 people in about a decade of application.

Among the most important strategic pieces of the meta church model is the value of apprenticing as both a leadership development strategy and a leader multiplication strategy. At the core of the apprenticing value was the practice that every new group had to begin with a leader and an apprentice in place and the explicit understanding that when the group grew and was ready to birth (approximately 10 to 12 members), both the mother and the daughter group would both have leaders. The expectation was that this process might take 12 to 18 months.

I embraced the model (as practiced by Willow Creek) and for 7 or 8 years not only put it to use in my own ministry but taught it to other churches that I came in contact with.

Two important notes:

  1. Apprenticing as a leadership development strategy is very effective. Experienced leaders investing in new leaders is always a good thing. It is a biblical practice. It is a stewardship practice. Everyone ought to be apprenticing.
  2. Apprenticing as a leader multiplication strategy is less effective.  Apprenticing as a leader multiplication strategy is often ineffective for two main reasons:
  • Too often the apprentice actually functions as a type of co-leader. Perhaps stepping in when the leader is out of town or taking a turn leading the discussion, but without the intention of one day helping launch a daughter group.
  • More seriously, apprenticing as a leader multiplication strategy typically takes 12 to 18 months. While they would never turn down additional leaders, most churches would not be able to close their percentage connected gap by producing a new leader every 12 to 18 months. See also, What Percentage of Your Adults Are Actually Connected?

After a careful analysis I came to the conclusion that, at least in my case and for what I was trying to accomplish, apprenticing would not be a primary tool for leadership multiplication. Valuable for leader development, yes, but multiplication, no. Other strategies are much more effective at leader multiplication.

What axiomatic beliefs do you hold about groups that actually aren’t true?

An axiom is an established rule or principle or self-evident truth.  We all have them stored away in our brains. The key is that not all of them are true…and not all of them are the kind that will always be true.

Consider this line from Gary Hamel’s The Future of Management:

All of us are held hostage by our axiomatic beliefs.  We are jailbirds incarcerated within the fortress of dogma and precedent.  And yet, for the most part, we are oblivious to our own captivity (p. 126, The Future of Management).”

This got me thinking; wondering what are the axiomatic beliefs of small groups and small group ministry?  Here’s my attempt at a top ten.  Not all of them are true.  None of these are mine.  You look them over and then use the comment section to add to the list.

  1. The senior pastor needs to lead a group.
  2. Good groups grow and birth.
  3. The optimum environment for life-change is a small group.
  4. Elders or deacons are a good source for group leaders or coaches.
  5. The longer a group is together the more deeply connected the members become.
  6. Good groups practice the open chair.
  7. The “career path” of a leader is member, apprentice leader, leader, coach.
  8. Once a group gets to about 12 members, it’s pregnant and needs to start preparing to birth.
  9. The semester idea offers more “jump in” opportunities and offers the assurance that it’s only a 13 week commitment. (The semester model is often referred to as the Free Market model.
  10. Sermon-based curriculum makes your group stickier.

Here’s the thing about axiomatic beliefs.  If you want to break through to a better way of helping people connect, grow spiritually, and impact their world…you’re going to have to debug your thinking and begin proactively developing paths that lead from where you are to where you want to be.

Remember, “Your ministry is perfectly designed to produce the results you are currently experiencing (Andy Stanley).” If you don’t like the results, it may be that your design is based on a belief or two that isn’t actually true.

Image by SIV-Athens

Friday’s List | June 16

fridays-listEvery Friday I post a short list of the things I’m reading, listening to, loving and wrestling with:

Here’s what I’m reading right now:

3 Truths About The Accelerating Pace Of Change And Leadership by Carey Nieuwhof. So good! Read this today!

How to Lead Your Team in the Same Direction by Dan Reiland. Always great stuff. Don’t miss this one if you lead a team.

SIX STAGES OF A DYING CHURCH by Thom Rainer. This is very good. Read it whether you think your church is dying or not!

Why Small Churches Get Stuck: 3 Changes Leaders Avoid Making by Chad Hunt on TonyMorganLive.com. Great insights here.

Make two lists by Seth Godin. Always surprised to find people who don’t know who Seth is, this is a great example of his thinking.

GEORGE WASHINGTON SHOWS US HOW LEADERS ARE READERS by Michael Hyatt. Must read. Very good.

10 Books Every Leader Should Read This Summer by Brian K. Dodd. Great list!

4 Chair Discipling: Growing a Movement of Disciple-Makers by Dann Spader. Just 20 pages in and this is another great book. Looking forward to blogging about it.

The Culture Engine: A Framework for Driving Results, Inspiring Your Employees, and Transforming Your Workplace by S. Chris Edmonds. Part of my learning path this year.

Here’s what I’m listening to:

Patrick Lencioni—The Ideal Team Player on the EntreLeadership Podcast. Pulled this one from the EntreLeadership archives. Great stuff!

INNOVATION = MANAGED CHAOS with Eric Schmidt on the Masters of Scale Podcast. This podcast is hosted by Reid Hoffman, founder of LinkedIn.

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg in Lead, Lead Again. Again, on the Masters of Scale Podcast with Reid Hoffman. I learned a lot!

The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future Audible Audiobook – Unabridged by Kevin Kelly. Very interesting. One of the books I’m recommending on my 2017 Summer Reading List.

Quotes I’m wrestling with:

“Disciple-making for Jesus meant meeting the needs of people where they were spiritually and challenging them to the next level.” Dann Spader, 4 Chair Discipling: Growing a Movement of Disciple-Makers.

App I’m using:

I’m committed this year to increasing my effectiveness. Nozbe is a leading productivity app. First heard about it from Michael Hyatt. It’s already making a big difference.

My own post I hope you’re reading:

My Top Small Group Ministry Learnings 2016 – 2017.  I like to think of myself as a learner. On the StrengthsFinder tool I am also futuristic with a twist of ideation. I’ve been called a mad scientist (and it’s one of my favorite tags). At one stop I almost convinced my boss that my new title should be The Destructor of the Status Quo.

Here’s my list of top learnings from the 2016-17 ministry year…

Don’t Miss The Disciple Maker’s Handbook! A Great Addition

Worked my way through a new book by Bobby Harrington and Josh Patrick. The Disciple Maker’s Handbook: Seven Elements of a Discipleship Lifestyle is Harrington’s latest contribution to the relational disciple-making conversation.

Harrington is the lead pastor of Harpeth Christian Church in Franklin, TN, and also the founder of Discipleship.org (along with Todd Wilson of Exponential).

Although I found The Disciple Maker’s Handbook to be easy to read, there were many sections that I re-read to make sure I took in everything intended. My copy is pretty marked up, as there is a lot here that will come in handy again and again.

A brief introduction sets up part one of the book which makes a compelling case for disciple making as the priority of the Church. The aim of the book “is to help you understand what Jesus did and how he did it–and how you can emulate his commitment to reach people and make disciples (p. 13).”

“The Disciple Maker’s Handbook includes some key tools:

  • A simple, clear picture of what it means to be a disciple and make disciples
  • A practical model for disciple making that you could use right away
  • The seven elements of disciple making taken from the life of Jesus
  • Inspiration and real-life stories to help you apply these teachings
  • An explicit invitation to join the discipleship-first revolution
  • An appendix with key insights for pastors and leaders (p. 14)”

I found part two particularly helpful with its detailed look at the seven elements of a discipleship lifestyle. Harrington presents a simple model that is very transferable and could easily be incorporated into most churches and most ministries.

Most helpful to me was Harrington’s emphasis on a relational disciple making model. By carefully observing Jesus’ own method, we learn that “disciple making is a relational process, one build on trust.”

I came away with many practical applications and an excellent overview of a very transferable model and method. The Disciple Maker’s Handbook is a must-read and I highly recommend it.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above may be “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

My Top Small Group Ministry Learnings 2016 – 2017

I like to think of myself as a learner. On the StrengthsFinder tool I am also futuristic with a twist of ideation. I’ve been called a mad scientist (and it’s one of my favorite tags). At one stop I almost convinced my boss that my new title should be The Destructor of the Status Quo.

Here’s my list of top learnings from the 2016-17 ministry year:

  1. The best time to connect a new leader with a coach is at the very beginning. And I mean the VERY beginning. When a new leader is chosen at one of our Life Group Connections, they are introduced to their coach in the stand-up meeting that follows the connection. See also, Skill Training: The Best Way to Connect a New Leader with a Coach.
  2. We don’t yet know how to sustain a high percentage of “host” groups. By “host” groups I mean the groups that we launch by inviting people to “do the study with a couple friends.” We’ve regularly launched hundreds of new “host” groups in conjunction with our fall church-wide campaigns and always sustain some of them into a follow-up study. We’ve tried coaching them with a weekly  email and invited them to our host rally…but clearly have room for improvement. See also, Saddleback Changed the Church-Wide Campaign Game…Again.
  3. Language matters. This is more of reminder. Whether you’re inviting people to consider “doing the study with a couple friends” or challenging them to join a six-week Life Group where they can get everything possible out of the message series,” language matters. Every word matters and results are quantifiable. See also, 5 Tiny Language Tweaks that Make a Very Big Difference.
  4. We need to do a better job of identifying the lead measures that predict discipleship outcomes. We are clear on the relationship between design and results. We have a good understanding of the lead measures that result in toes-in-water, we’ve only partially identified the steps that lead to better disciples. See also, FAQ: What Should We Be Measuring (to build a thriving small group ministry)?
  5. We need to codify the things that must be done to and for leaders. What some on our team do intuitively must be defined in a way that can be learned and is transferable. Translation: Everything must scale. See also, 7 Things You Must Do TO and FOR Your Small Group Leaders.
  6. Building an effective coaching structure doesn’t make caring for leaders easier. Adding a layer of high capacity leaders who do to and for leaders what you want leaders to do to and for members creates a challenging environment that requires greater attention to personal discipleship. The outcome of an effective coaching structure is greater capacity to make better disciples, but intensifies the effort required from top to bottom. See also, Skill Training: Equip Your Coaches to Develop and Disciple Leaders.
  7. Transitioning from silos to full alignment is a never ending process. Aligning affinities (couples, singles, men and women) is step one and easier to understand and compel. The payoff of aligning broadly (missions, next generation, evangelism and worship) is temporary and quickly forgotten. Enduring alignment is conversation intensive, painstaking, and never ending. See also, Insight: Repositioning Affinity Ministries Helps Create Alignment.
  8. Adding a multi-site philosophy is a beast unto itself. Like the alignment transition, developing and supervising is a daily endeavor. It is conversation intensive, painstaking, and never ending.

4 Things Small Groups Are Not (or shouldn’t be)

4 Things Small Groups Are Not (or shouldn’t be)

I’ve written a lot about what small group ministries should be (to thrive, to be effective, etc.). But I don’t think I’ve ever written about what small groups aren’t or shouldn’t be. See also, 10 Powerful Benefits of a Thriving Small Group Ministry.

Take a few minutes and look over my list of 4 things small groups are not (or shouldn’t be). You may discover you’ve landed on a system, model or strategy that focuses attention on a limited outcome.

Here are 4 things small groups are not (or shouldn’t be):

Simply about connecting people. Far too often, small group ministry becomes the primary place to connect people and what happens there is limited to fellowship alone. Yes, connecting unconnected people is very important and makes sense strategically to be step one on the making better disciples pathway. But…the most effective small group ministries learn to connect people and make disciples in the 21st century.

See also, Top 10 Posts on Discipleship and Making Disciples in Groups.

Mostly about learning about the Bible. Some small group ministries gravitate to the role of being an environment where people go to learn about the Bible. Yes, learning about the Bible is important. But learning about the Bible ought never be the sole purpose or reason for small group ministry.

Without intentionality, small groups naturally gravitate to two of the five purposes (fellowship and discipleship, to use a Saddleback understanding) while ministry, evangelism and worship are left on the sideline.

With intentionality, small groups can be encouraged and assisted to “balance” the purposes and more effectively make better disciples.

See also, Balancing the 5 Purposes.

Where serious disciples congregate. Some small group ministries become the place where serious disciples gather. Setting the entry bar too high and limiting participation to those who are ready to “take up their cross and follow Jesus” as opposed to simply being open to “coming and seeing” skips the preliminary stage that Jesus modeled with his own disciples.

Effective small group ministries make entry attractive and appealing to unconnected people and once connected provide the natural steps for greater commitment.

See also, Diagnosing Your Discipleship Strategy and Moving from “Come and See” to “Come and Die”

A stage to be completed. A simplistic understanding of Willow Creek’s Reveal study is that small groups are most important during the Exploring and Growing in Christ stages and less important during the Close to Christ and Christ-Centered stages.

The conclusion for some has been that groups are only beneficial for those exploring Christ or growing in their relationship with Christ and that once a person matures beyond that stage, they no longer need community. However, even a cursory review of Reveal’s findings reveal that more mature believers often develop more organic relationships that accomplish the desirable effects.

See also, Ever Noticed Reveal’s Crowd-to-Core Wrinkle?

What do you think?  Want to argue?  You can click here to jump into the conversation.

FAQ: What’s the Best Way to Connect the Largest Number of Unconnected People?

What’s the Best Way to Connect the Largest Number of Unconnected People?

There are frequently asked questions…and then there are FREQUENTLY asked questions. This is one of the most frequent questions I am asked.

“What’s the best way to connect the largest number of unconnected people?”

Usually, the asker has done the math and realized that their percentage connected is dangerously low and that long before their current small group model, system or strategy will make any kind of significant dent, large numbers of unconnected people will have come and gone.

Usually, the asker has finally faced up to the fact that unconnected people are always one tough thing away from never being at their church again and is ready to make some changes.

Unconnected people are always one tough thing away from never being at their church againUnconnected people are always one tough thing away from never being at their church again Click To Tweet

“Change happens when the pain of staying the same is greater than the pain of change.” Tony Robbins

Let’s get personal. Are you there yet?

Are you there yet? Have you finally arrived at the conclusion that your current small group model, system or strategy won’t actually make a significant dent in your percentage connected?

If that’s you, here’s how I answer the question, “What’s the best way to connect the largest number of unconnected people?”

What’s the Best Way to Connect the Largest Number of Unconnected People?

While there are a number of strategies that will connect unconnected people (and all of them involve prioritizing the launch of new groups), there is actually a way to rank them in terms of their potential. See also, Ranking the Most Powerful Strategies for Launching New Groups.

And there is one strategy that easily surpasses all others in terms of its ability to launch a wave of new groups and connect large numbers of unconnected people at a time.

While North Point’s GroupLink strategy and Saddleback’s Small Group Connection strategies both are excellent at launching new groups and connecting unconnected people, they fall well short of the potential of a well conceived, well planned and well executed church-wide campaign.

Here’s my answer:

The best way to connect the largest number of unconnected people is a well conceived, well planned and well executed church-wide campaign.

There are a few important points in that statement:

First, a well conceived church-wide campaign is very different than one grabbed off the shelf without much forethought or analysis. A well conceived campaign is thoughtfully chosen. It is selected for its topic and chosen with a type of person in mind. Careful consideration is given to who the church would like to connect or what specific next step they would like participants to take.

Second, a well planned campaign is designed to do more than connect unconnected people and launch new groups. In a well planned campaign, attention is paid to important details in advance. Details like, what will need to do to help the largest number of new groups continue to meet after the campaign is over and when does the campaign need to begin in order to maximize participation?

Third, a well executed campaign is an exercise in precision. Everything is scripted in advance and nothing is last-minute or ad lib. Careful attention is paid to timing and focus. Timelines are developed and religiously adhered to. Every detail is scrutinized in advance and evaluated afterward.

Does a church-wide campaign fit your needs this fall?

If you’ve realized that a church-wide campaign would finally help your church connect unconnected people and launch new groups, but you also know you’ll need help pulling it off, take a look at Launching a Church-Wide Campaign This Fall? This article contains a number of free resources and also information on two resources designed to help your church develop a well conceived, well planned and well executed church-wide campaign.

Further Reading:

Launching a Church-Wide Campaign This Fall?

Ranking the Most Powerful Strategies for Launching New Groups

What Percentage of Your Adults Are Actually Connected?